Wednesday, May 23, 2018

BEAUTY SCIENCE: Linoleic Acid

Hear the word "acid" and we automatically think "danger".   Doing without Linoleic Acid, however, is the real danger.  Linoleic Acid is a polyunsaturated fatty acid and is part of the Omega 6 fatty acids, found in many vegetable oils.

One of the most important roles for Linoleic Acid is caring for your skin's barrier functions - protecting against water loss and keeping invading allergens and bacteria out.  Linoleic acid
is required by our body to make ceramide 1 linoleate.  The Ceramides play a vital role in the formation of the lipid bi-layers, found between the cells of the stratum corneum (outer layer), that keep your skin strong and resilient.
Eat Foods Rich in Linoleic Acid
Lack of Linoleic Acid can create other problems, including acne, dry skin, dry hair, poor nails, flaky scaling skin, poor wound healing and even depression.  It is no surprise then that Linoleic Acid is often used as an ingredient in beauty products for the treatment of these same problems. It is used as an emulsifier, and in the making of soaps and quick-drying oils; it is also used as for its anti-inflammatory, acne reduction, and moisture retention properties.  Linoleic acid also stimulates hair growth, maintains a healthy scalp conditions, and will control water loss in your hair. 
Bottom line: If your skin type is dry or sensitive, or you suffer from rosacea, eczema or dermatitis, then linoleic acid should be a best friend.  Prevention of skin & scalp/hair dryness can be achieved in part by including linoleic acid in your diet and in your skin care creams.  (The chart below can help.) 


Name % Linoleic acid
Safflower oil
78%
Grape seed oil
73%
Evening Primrose Oil
70%
Sunflower oil
68%
Hemp oil
60%
Pumpkin Seed Oil
57%
Wheat germ oil
55%
Cottonseed oil
54%
Soybean oil
51%
Walnut oil
51%
Sesame oil
45%
Rice bran oil
39%
Argan Oil
35%
Peanut oil
32%
Canola oil
21%
Olive Oil
10%
Cocoanut Oil
2%

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