Monday, July 20, 2015

Shampoo Facts

Shampoo is not the most important part of washing. You can buy the most expensive shampoo on the market, but if you aren't using it correctly you won't see results. Massaging the scalp and hair as well as the rinsing are the most important parts of washing your hair.  Use the cushions of your fingers to massage the scalp while you shampoo in order to get rid of the secretion of sebum (an oily, waxy substance) so hair follicles can grow healthily from the scalp. And always be sure to rinse the shampoo completely out of your hair to prevent buildup.
Natural home remedies aren't necessarily better. Just because a shampoo contains a natural ingredient doesn't mean that ingredient is good for you on its own. Lemon, for example, can irritate the scalp and hair follicle.  Mint and menthol—which, when used in salon products can create a soothing effect—can actually cause severe allergic reactions when used in home remedies. So don't use shampoos as guides to what to use on your hair—they've all been formulated and balanced by professionals.
Less is more. Using too much shampoo—more than a quarter-sized amount––to create a lot of foam is actually counterproductive.  Foam can help you effectively work the shampoo into the hair and scalp, but too much foam actually prevents you from massaging the shampoo in properly.
Blondes need to use clarifying shampoo more often. If you have chemically treated light hair, you need to use a clarifying shampoo more consistently. Dyed or highlighted hair—particularly bleached hair—becomes very porous, so it can easily absorb unwanted yellowish tones from the outside environment, like from hairspray, perspiration, city smog and even minerals from your shower water.  Using a clarifying shampoo weekly will help dissolve product and natural buildup, neutralizing those unwanted tones.
Your hair doesn't get used to shampoo over time. If you notice your shampoo isn't working quite as well as it used to, don't toss the bottle. Your hair changes with the seasons, so that might account for a difference in texture. If you aren't rinsing thoroughly enough, there might be a buildup of product on your scalp. It has nothing to do with the shampoo not working for you anymore. You don't change your face cleanser, so why would you change your shampoo?
Even the fanciest shampoo can't permanently change your hair. Washing your hair with the right shampoo is like a great exercise program: As long as you do it you'll look good, but if you quit, three months later you're back to where you started.
Not all ingredients are created equally. Many shampoos contain foaming agents like ammonium lauryl sulfate, ammonium laureth sulfate or sodium lauryl sulfate, which are harsh and drying to the scalp.  Sodium laureth sulfate is a gentler agent, as well as TEA lauryl or laureth sulfates, which are also goo
d picks.

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